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Principals' digital transformational leadership, teachers' commitment, and school effectiveness

In press
Izhak Berkovich, Tahani Hassan
Education Inquiry

Abstract

The knowledge about principals’ digital transformational leadership in schools is scarce. This lacuna is problematic because recently many countries switched to remote schooling and online learning models during the COVID-19 pandemic. The new situation changed the principal’s role to one of distant digital leadership, working with teachers and students remotely. The present study aims to investigate principals’ digital transformational leadership and its outcomes. The research is based on data from 380 teachers in Bahrain. The findings and their implications for effective remote schooling are discussed.

 

Principals’ digital instructional leadership during the pandemic: Impact on teachers’ intrinsic motivation and students’ learning

In press
Izhak Berkovich, Tahani Hassan
Educational Management Administration and Leadership

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic caused education systems to embrace remote schooling and online learning. In the context of this dramatic change, the principal’s role has also changed. Instead of interacting face to face, school leaders had to become distant leaders operating digitally. The field has no knowledge of digital instructional leadership. The study used new and adapted measures to explore principals’ digital instructional leadership, its mechanisms of operation, and its outcomes. In particular, the research examined how digital instructional leadership affects perceived student learning in online settings through teachers’ intrinsic motivation for digital instruction (i.e. the mediator). The study used data from 380 teachers in Bahrain. Results indicated support for mediation. This is an empirical exploratory study, and therefore it is limited in scope. Nevertheless, its concepts, measures, and findings offer valuable contributions to research and practice. The limitations, findings, and implications of the study are discussed. The significance of the study derives from the growing incorporation of hybrid schooling in education and digital instructional leadership practices in mainstream principalship.

Supervisors as definers of a new middle-level managers' leadership model: Typology of four middle-level leadership prototypes in early childhood education

In press
Smadar Moshel, Izhak Berkovich
Leadership and Policy in Schools

Abstract

Much research is concerned with the contribution of middle-level management in the education system. Yet, little research has been devoted to investigating supervisors’ considerations in outlining job definitions of middle-level managers, and how these elements shape diverse middle-level managers’ leadership models. This study draws on role theory to understand supervisors’ contribution to the design of middle-level management roles, with emphasis on leadership styles. Data included 25 interviews with preschool superintendents who appointed new middle-level managers in the role of early childhood leaders. Based on the interviews, we identified four types of middle-level leadership models: pedagogical, supportive, change, and administrative.

A review of rigor and ethics in qualitative educational administration, management, and leadership research articles published in 1999-2018

In press
Izhak Berkovich, Yael Grinshtain
Leadership and Policy in Schools

Abstract

This study aimed to explore the rigor strategies and ethical steps reported in qualitative research of educational administration journals in the recent decades. Using a focused search procedure, 321 relevant empirical qualitative articles were identified. Results suggest that qualitative educational administration, management, and leadership research frequently reported using some rigor strategies and greatly underreport on using ethical steps. Moreover, we found stability in the number of strategies and steps reported over a period of two decades. Thus, it is unclear whether rigor and ethics norms in the field have been crystallizing over time. The findings and their implications are discussed.

 

Participative decision making in schools in individualist and collectivist cultures: The micro-politics behind distributed leadership

In press
Mor Hodaya Or, Izhak Berkovich
Educational Management Administration and Leadership

Abstract

Despite the popularity of distributed leadership theory, the investigation of the micro-political aspects of such models have scarcely been explored, and insights on the cultural variety of distributed practices in schools are limited. The present study aimed to explore what micro-political aspects emerge in participative decision‐making in collectivist and individualist cultures. To this end, a multiple case study method was adopted, focusing on four Israeli public high schools. Schools were chosen to represent an ‘extreme’ case selection rationale: two non-religious urban schools representing individualist cases, and two communal schools in religious kibbutzim representing communal schools. The analysis shed light on three micro-political points of comparison between the prototypes of participative decision making in collectivist and individualist cultures related to control, actors, and stage crafting. The findings and implications are discussed.